Question: Reload ".Loc" Files Without Restarting The Galaxy Server?
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gravatar for Luobin Yang
7.2 years ago by
Luobin Yang30
Luobin Yang30 wrote:
Hi all, I am wondering if it's possible to to reload a ".loc" file without restarting the Galaxy server? Thanks, Luobin
galaxy • 1.2k views
ADD COMMENTlink modified 7.2 years ago by Roman Valls130 • written 7.2 years ago by Luobin Yang30
0
gravatar for Jennifer Hillman Jackson
7.2 years ago by
United States
Jennifer Hillman Jackson25k wrote:
Hello Luobin, At this time, a restart is necessary for the dataset to be incorporated. Thanks for using Galaxy! Best, Jen Galaxy team -- Jennifer Jackson http://usegalaxy.org http://galaxyproject.org
ADD COMMENTlink written 7.2 years ago by Jennifer Hillman Jackson25k
Hi Jen, I'd also like to be able to reload *.loc files without having to restart Galaxy. I filed an enhancement bug: https://bitbucket.org/galaxy/galaxy-central/issue/538 Peter
ADD REPLYlink written 7.1 years ago by Peter Cock1.4k
Folks, I wanted to scan the 2kb upstream of a list of human gene isoforms for TFBS using fuzznuc. I was able to "Get Data"> "UCSC Main" > "As sequence" and get my sequences "EMBOSS" > fuzznuc ran fine, and output the hits HOWEVER, fuzznuc lost the genomic position information that UCSC has put after a space in the sequence headers of the FASTA file. It only provided offsets within the fasta. http://main.g2.bx.psu.edu/u/curtish-uab/h/ucsc-fuzznuc-ucsc-broken Thus, when I converted the fuzznuc output back to a BED file and tried to visualize the hits in UCSC browser, it failed with "invalid BED File". I tried fuzznuc with output: seqtable, feattable and gff3, but in all cases the genomic position was missing, and being a bit of Galaxy novice, I couldn't figure out how to get the output back to UCSC to visualize the hits. Can anyone tell me how to link up these tools correctly, or share a history with some other tool set that accomplishes this goal? Regards, Curtis Research Associate Center for Clinical and Translational Science University of Alabama at Birmingham
ADD REPLYlink written 7.1 years ago by Robert Curtis Hendrickson130
Hello Curtis, The coordinates of your match are with respect to the fasta sequence, not with respect to the reference genome. Only data mapped to the reference genome can be viewed in the UCSC Browser You will need to calculate from the position of the match in the fasta sequence back through to the reference genome. One suggested way to do this: a) Merge together the original genomic coordinates of the 2kb regions with each line of output from fuzznuc. Use the original source fasta sequence name as the common key for the merge. If both data are in BED format, that would be ideal and make the following steps possible. You may need to split the file based on whether the original fasta sequence came from the positive or negative strand to run "b" and "c" below separately. b) Use "Text Manipulation -> Compute an expression on every row" to create new coordinates. For example, if your data is on the positive strand, and base 1 in your fasta file was genomic coordinate 100, and the alignment from fuzznuc started at base 5 (local coordinate == "4" if in BED format with a zero-based start), then the new genomic start coordinate would be [100 + 4)] = 104. Do this for both start and stop. c) Adjust the logic for "b" if any of your original fasta sequences are from the negative strand, on the negative strand portion of your data ("b" would be run on just the positive strand portion of your data). d) arrange/cut the resulting file down into a standard BED format to remove the local coordinates and keep the genomic coordinates, using the original chromosome names. e) once the logic for the calculations is worked out, save the process into a workflow for use again. Hopefully this helps, Best, Jen Galaxy team -- Jennifer Jackson http://usegalaxy.org http://galaxyproject.org
ADD REPLYlink written 7.1 years ago by Jennifer Hillman Jackson25k
Jennifer, Thanks for the outline. I'll try that approach. However, it seems rather painful to have to join the fuzznuc output back to the original fasta to get at the header information that really should have been passed along. It would see that there must be a way to get the data out of UCSC without that space in the fasta header, so that the chromosome & genomic location get correctly preserved in the fuzznuc output. Failing that, is there an easy text manipulation that would convert that fasta header space to a "|"? Regards, Curtis To: Robert Curtis Hendrickson Cc: 'galaxy-user@lists.bx.psu.edu' Subject: Re: [galaxy-user] UCSC->EMBOSS/fuzznuc->UCSC workflow? Hello Curtis, The coordinates of your match are with respect to the fasta sequence, not with respect to the reference genome. Only data mapped to the reference genome can be viewed in the UCSC Browser You will need to calculate from the position of the match in the fasta sequence back through to the reference genome. One suggested way to do this: a) Merge together the original genomic coordinates of the 2kb regions with each line of output from fuzznuc. Use the original source fasta sequence name as the common key for the merge. If both data are in BED format, that would be ideal and make the following steps possible. You may need to split the file based on whether the original fasta sequence came from the positive or negative strand to run "b" and "c" below separately. b) Use "Text Manipulation -> Compute an expression on every row" to create new coordinates. For example, if your data is on the positive strand, and base 1 in your fasta file was genomic coordinate 100, and the alignment from fuzznuc started at base 5 (local coordinate == "4" if in BED format with a zero-based start), then the new genomic start coordinate would be [100 + 4)] = 104. Do this for both start and stop. c) Adjust the logic for "b" if any of your original fasta sequences are from the negative strand, on the negative strand portion of your data ("b" would be run on just the positive strand portion of your data). d) arrange/cut the resulting file down into a standard BED format to remove the local coordinates and keep the genomic coordinates, using the original chromosome names. e) once the logic for the calculations is worked out, save the process into a workflow for use again. Hopefully this helps, Best, Jen Galaxy team -- Jennifer Jackson http://usegalaxy.org http://galaxyproject.org
ADD REPLYlink written 7.1 years ago by Robert Curtis Hendrickson130
Hello Curtis, No need to use the fasta headers from your original fasta file. To obtain the coordinates in BED format: using "Get Data -> UCSC main" again to link to the UCSC Table browser, set the same selection criteria as for the original fasta sequence, only change the output type to be "BED" (instead of "sequence"). Once in your Galaxy history, this format will be easier to work with. Best, Jen Galaxy team -- Jennifer Jackson http://usegalaxy.org http://galaxyproject.org
ADD REPLYlink written 7.1 years ago by Jennifer Hillman Jackson25k
0
gravatar for Roman Valls
7.2 years ago by
Roman Valls130
Roman Valls130 wrote:
On standard UNIX, the SIGHUP signal (kill -HUP <pid>) is used to perform this kind of actions (re-read config files) on almost all daemons [1]. Doing a quick grep: $ grep -ri "HUP" galaxy-central Nothing shows up, so as Jen indicated, does not seem to be implemented at first glance... but one could have a look at: http://docs.python.org/library/signal.html And handle that signal... I guess that the daemon would be "paster", but haven't found where it reads the loc files :-S [1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SIGHUP
ADD COMMENTlink written 7.2 years ago by Roman Valls130
I actually implemented SIGHUP and then found that it would not work: http://bugs.python.org/issue7978 If that patch actually made it to a 2.6 minor release it may solve the problem and I could commit this code. --nate
ADD REPLYlink written 7.2 years ago by Nate Coraor3.2k
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